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Luis Torres creates celestial looks for Phoenix Lights with Chauvet

26/04/2024

Martin Audio WPS provides weight for The K’s album launch at Warrington’s Parr Hall

24/04/2024

Hippotizer selected for Finnish TV show “Tähdet, tähdet”

23/04/2024

Martin Audio WP rigged in twelve minutes for UB40 show at St. Andrews Stadium

22/04/2024

Jimmy Olausson brings element of surprise to Avatar’s winter tour with Chauvet

18/04/2024

Mitch Rowland turns to Britannia Row for headline solo tour

17/04/2024

GLP-Scheinwerfer bei Senior-Bowl-Gala im Einsatz

05/03/2024

Lightswitch evolves “Enchanted: Forest of Light” with expanded Elation lighting package

29/02/2024

Shure-Drahtlossysteme beim Super Bowl LVIII im Einsatz

28/02/2024

Kreateur begleitet „Jugend forscht“ 2024 in Berlin

28/02/2024

Jeremy Roth turns to Robe for Nathaniel Rateliff’s homecoming holiday concert in Denver

27/02/2024

Elation and Best Audio & Lighting support CQLP lighting design competition in France

27/02/2024

GrandMA3 lighting control system selected for Crush shows in Seoul

27/02/2024

Kerstcircus Ahoy lit with Chauvet

27/02/2024

Antonis Remos tours with equipment from DiGiCo and Klang

27/02/2024

UK panto shows lit with Robe

27/02/2024

Von Nüssli realisierte Achtfach-Turnhalle in Monheim feiert Richtfest

27/02/2024

Brompton Technology helps D&B Audiotechnik create immersive demo in Japan

26/02/2024

Axel Melchior chooses Chauvet for Circus Knie

26/02/2024

Ben Green and Invoke create Emmys Red Carpet looks with Chauvet

26/02/2024

SWG returns to Mobos with Martin Audio WPL line array

26/02/2024

Thomas Cassetta chooses DPA Microphones for stand-up shows, documentaries and podcasts

26/02/2024

Version 2 supplies lighting for EE BAFTA Film Awards

26/02/2024

GrandMA3 for Hypersonic Fest

23/02/2024

Eighth Day Sound delivers audio solutions for Dizzee Rascal’s “Boy in da Corner” 20th anniversary tour

23/02/2024

Luis Torres creates celestial looks for Phoenix Lights with Chauvet

Luis Torres creates celestial looks for Phoenix Lights with Chauvet
Luis Torres creates celestial looks for Phoenix Lights with Chauvet

Taking place on the Raceway in Phoenix, Arizona, at the end of March, the Phoenix Lights 2024 festival featured a wide range of EDM performances, supported by a light and video show created by Luis Torres on a 100-foot wide and 48-foot tall rig. Torres channeled the musical energy into visuals with help from forty Chauvet Professional Color Strike M and thirty Maverick MK3 Wash fixtures supplied by Hardwired Productions.

 

Like the rest of the lighting fixtures in his rig, the Color Strike and Maverick units were spread throughout the truss structures. Torres did this to create unexpected visual moments and convey the kind of uncertain spontaneity that was in keeping with the festival’s supernova theme. “I wanted the rig to have different moments and surprises”, he says. “That’s why I had lights on the video trusses but also in between the video strips. This way, when video was off, I could have the lighting pop up and fill the gaps.”

 

Using his Color Strike M fixtures as strobes, Torres arranged them in four rows of ten units each, having five located on each side of the circular truss that held the main video screen. “As strobes, these fixtures helped give the rig that important width and symmetry”, he says. “I like doing this sort of thing in my designs. Having the strobe in rows, open the chance to create some neat chase effects.”

 

“Given that the theme of the show was ‘Phoenix Lights Supernova’, having the Color Strike Ms cover the width allowed me to create effects that could reflect a supernova - an explosion of a star in the galaxy”, he continues. “Probably my favorite look in the show was when we had all the strobes on in full output around the circle.”

 

Torres placed twelve of his Maverick fixtures on each side of the circle. He arranged the units in rows of six pieces. “The MK3s gave me that bright pop I was looking for in between the video strips. The other MK3 units were used for key light for the DJ and the dancer platforms that were in the outside corner of the scaffold structures.”

 

Radiating light in different patterns around the circular truss, the Color Strike and Maverick fixtures gave this central video element a floating celestial look that also played into the festival’s theme. The often-surreal images displayed on that video screen conveyed an even greater space-like vibe.

 

(Photos: Chauvet Professional)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

Luis Torres creates celestial looks for Phoenix Lights with ChauvetLuis Torres creates celestial looks for Phoenix Lights with Chauvet

Martin Audio WPS provides weight for The K’s album launch at Warrington’s Parr Hall

After playing a stretch of intimate in-store shows at independent record shops across the nation to announce their debut album “I Wonder If The World Knows”, The K’s arrived at one of their local concert venues, the 1000-cap, Grade II-listed Parr Hall in Warrington on April 10, 2024.

 

Martin Audio rental partner DBS Solutions were brought in to provide their flagship WPS (Wavefront Precision) scalable line array. This was set in a ground-stacked configuration, as due to weight limitation flying the PA wasn’t an option. The WPS was mounted, six-a-side, on a single SXCF118 cardioid sub, while a further six WS218X subs were arranged in a broadside array in the pit. Providing front fill coverage were four Martin Audio WPM, in 2-box stacks.

 

In the balcony of the building Martin Audio XD15s were deployed as fills in biamp mode, tied into the venue’s Torus T1230 constant curvature short throw speakers. DBS Solutions deployed a pair of iKon amp racks, each housing three iK42. They were able to power the main PA in the optimum 1-box resolution.

 

Systems engineer Daniel Clare designed the rig in such a way as to provide coverage to both the primary standing area and the initial parts of the balcony, where the house Torus system in this Victorian venue took over to provide even coverage into the furthest recesses of the upper balcony. The band’s FOH engineer was Ben Hubbard.

 

(Photos: Natalie Persoglio)

 

www.martin-audio.com

 

Hippotizer selected for Finnish TV show “Tähdet, tähdet”

Finland’s TV contest “Tähdet, tähdet”, produced by Moskito Television, returned for 2024 with a host of singers belting out numbers ranging from 1980s pop to Eurovision classics. Broadcast on Finnish channel Nelonen, audiences watched performances backed by nine ROE Vanish V8T LED screens with live and pre-made content manipulated using TVOne’s Green Hippo brand of Hippotizer Media Servers.

 

“The set design required visual appeal tailored to the viewers both in the studio and at home”, explains Varpu Sipilä from Finnish visual design company Visual45, which was brought in to create the lighting and visual elements. “Lighting design and operation, as well as video content production and operation, played a significant role. Particularly, the use of video surfaces was emphasized to enhance the atmosphere of the performances.”

 

On stage, the Visual45 team deployed the nine ROE LED panels, all of which measured 2 x 3 metres, creating an enveloping canvas. More than 250 Sceptron LED tubes were positioned at the edges and at the top edges of the stage to create a sense of wider space, and more LED tubes were embedded in the judge’s table in a custom structure to reflect the shape of the stage. The Sceptrons were operated in hybrid mode, using a GrandMA2 light console and a Hippotizer Boreal+ MK2 Media Server linked to a laptop running ZooKeeper.

 

The design was led by Tero Kärpijoki from Visual45, whose expertise includes lighting design and visual design for TV productions. Content was created by Visual45’s Motion Graphics Designer Jani Saranpää, designed to complement each performance and drawing inspiration from the songs. The team created the content to act as a whole, with the lighting design in mind, but adapted the overall design to be individually distinct for every singer. In some numbers, live footage from cameras was played back on the screen, fed through the Hippotizer’s live inputs.

 

The Hippotizer Boreal+ MK2 Media Servers were supplied by Creative Technology Finland, which also provided the technical execution for the project.

 

(Photos: Green Hippo/TVOne/Visual45)

 

www.green-hippo.com

 

Martin Audio WP rigged in twelve minutes for UB40 show at St. Andrews Stadium

Within 15 minutes of completing victory over Preston North End on Easter Monday, Birmingham City’s St. Andrews stadium had been transformed into a rock concert venue. The production team behind the staging - enabling local legends UB40 to kick off their world tour and announce their new “UB45” album release - was Martin Audio partner 22live.

 

At the same time the football club was able to reveal its new branding. Henceforth known as St. Andrew’s @ Knighthead Park, the stadium provided the setting for this post match entertainment. But first 22live, led by Paul Timmins, had many challenges to overcome - not least where to site the fifteen ground stacks of Martin Audio WPC and WPS line array, as well as the speed of deployment to get the show underway immediately after the final whistle.

 

Two days’ rehearsal in Digbeth helped new monitor engineer Harry Le Masurier settle in, while staging options were debated and the fact that 56 channels were required, choice of stage was paramount. Timmins also knew this was no mere playback event - the band were going to perform live.

 

After dismissing other options they decided to construct the staging in the “sterile” area - or empty block of seating - segregating the home and away fans in the Gil Merrick stand. “The seats were removed, and the staging company built a two tiered stage because of the raking - set high up to avoid obscuring sightlines”, says Timmins. “Although big LED screens and lighting were able to be flown from the roof, in view of weight loading, audio was always going to be a pitch side perimeter speaker system.”

 

From past experience Paul Timmins was aware of safety implications, cabling challenges and the fact the speakers would need to be located behind the LED wall or advertising hoardings without blocking the access. But because of distance variations each stand required its own unique treatment. “The Main Stand is quite shallow and didn’t need as much power as the Kop side, so I chose WPS, four stacks high”, he explains. “On the Kop stand I used WPCs, four high because I needed more power. At the Tilton End I used WPC, three high, because I knew I could get away with less, with just two stacks WPS four high required on the Gil Merrick stage end - because coverage was only required on either side of the large centre section.”

 

Each stack was supported by an SXH218 sub. Torus T1230 speakers filled dead spots in corners between the Gil Merrick and the Kop stands and further T1230s and an SX118 subwoofer provided reference sound at the FOH mix position, which was located underneath the stands. Critical to the success of the optimisation was tilt angles. 22live knew that since they would be raking the system back into the stands, rather than have it tip forwards as would be customary, they could dispense with the standard WP grids in favour of straps. After verifying this custom approach with Martin Audio deployed this solution, which would also ensure each stack could be deployed swiftly as a single self-contained unit.

 

Crew boss Glen Little worked closely with extra local crew, who were experienced in dealing with Martin Audio boxes. Unlike a typical average home gate of around 19,000 this event drew 25,000 (since there was no increase in ticket price). DJ Jenny Powell led into the band, who played a full hour long set.

 

Production had to remain nimble and responsive to 11th hour requests. “In addition to the live sound we discovered we had to provide a broadcast mixdown from stems to Birmingham FC TV, and at the last minute they also wanted to record it - so we brought in Phil Wright, who is such a safe pair of hands, with his own kit to do the streaming”, concludes Timmins. “On top of it all, Birmingham City, after a wretched run of form, won the game, the sun came out for the concert and UB40 played a blinding set. It was one of those days where everything worked.” 

 

Other key personnel who contributed to the event’s success included tour manager Yaron Levy, with Russ Tite mixing at front of house. Jason McAvoy was control tech, Rylan Machin and Ryan Bass were the two system techs on duty, while other techs were Chris Wilcock and Jack Davis.

 

(Photos: Martin Audio/22live)

 

www.martin-audio.com

 

Jimmy Olausson brings element of surprise to Avatar’s winter tour with Chauvet

Jimmy Olausson brings element of surprise to Avatar’s winter tour with Chauvet

Lighting designer-programmer Jimmy Olausson was with his client Avatar on their European tour, when the metal band suddenly released the new song “Make It Rain” and asked him to program looks for it. “Normally, I prefer to do my programming in my office where I can focus on the details, so creating the lighting for ‘Make It Rain’ during the tour was a unique challenge”, he says. “But it turned out to be a fantastic addition to our set and gave me the opportunity to think outside the box, crafting a visual style for this song that stands out from the rest.”

 

Turning up the intensity level on his twelve Chauvet Professional Colorado Panel Q40 rectangular washes, Olausson created pixel mapped sequences that evoked the turbulent mood of an approaching storm. He coupled this with a “waterfall” effect that he created with house lights to immerse audiences in the moment.

 

“When programming this song, I focused on highlighting the pixel effects of the Q40 fixtures. I wanted to make it clear to the audience that these are multi-functional fixtures”, he explains. “Normally, I prefer a more subtle approach, using the unique features of a fixture to enhance the overall look without overwhelming it. But this particular song is intense and demands a lot, so I pushed the Q40s to their limits. They added a dynamic layer to the performance that aligns perfectly with the song’s energy.”

 

Olausson also served up some unexpected visual delights of his own during the two-hour seventeen-song set. “What sets this show apart from our previous tours is its element of surprise and its theatrical nature”, he states. “I’m constantly looking for new ways to surprise the crowd and keep the light show dynamic and engaging. We’ve incorporated more drama and unexpected moments, which is something we’re considering developing even further in our future designs and tours.”

 

Helping Olausson create his novel looks was a Chauvet Professional floor package, which, in addition to the Colorado Panel Q40, featured sixteen Rogue R2X Wash and ten Rogue R2 Beam fixtures, as well as four Cloud 9 foggers. “For this show, we kicked things off with an ‘everything at once’ approach,” he says. “It’s a bit of a shift from our last album cycle for ‘Hunter Gatherer’, where we started with a minimal setup and gradually added more elements. I really enjoy the immediate impact we created when the band played the first note. But not to worry, it’s not full-on intensity all the time. I carefully choose which fixtures to use and when, ensuring there’s a nice flow and balance throughout the set, so each song and moment feels just right.”

 

Olausson kept the mood going all show long, moving from intense monochromatic washes, to dark, shadowy looks punctuated by sharp, side-angled light. At times he changed things up going with bold aerial effects, then moving to crowd lighting. The use of atmospherics played a key role in his design plan. “When it comes to atmospherics, my key approach is to have a solid reason for using them in each part of the show”, he concludes. “For a piano ballad, it feels almost natural. I aim to let the low fog dominate the stage, using minimal lighting to spotlight the singer. Essentially, I’m crafting an ambient, enveloping environment - and hopefully one that is full of surprises.”

 

(Photos: Chauvet Professional)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

Jimmy Olausson brings element of surprise to Avatar’s winter tour with ChauvetJimmy Olausson brings element of surprise to Avatar’s winter tour with Chauvet

Mitch Rowland turns to Britannia Row for headline solo tour

Mitch Rowland turns to Britannia Row for headline solo tour

Singer/songwriter Mitch Rowland found notoriety as Harry Styles’ guitarist and co-writer, and the pair toured the world together for two years during “Love on Tour”, which saw Britannia Row Productions supply audio for all 169 shows. When the time came for Rowland to take the spotlight in his own right, the American multi-instrumentalist turned to Britannia Row for live audio services on a much smaller scale.

 

Forming a close-knit bond after “Love on Tour”, audio engineer Christian Zuniga was welcomed back into the fold as Rowland’s Monitor Mixer and Production Manager. He comments: “Mitch is not an up-and-coming artist, he’s been touring arenas and stadiums for years, so he’s used to high-level touring. However, when he presented this new project, he wanted to play in small theatres instead of opening for a big tour. Every place has been special as each venue carries history.”

 

As the first artist signed to Harry Styles’ Erskine Records, industry backing doesn’t come much stronger, and the same can be said for Rowland’s audio team who were keen to support the new venture. Working closely with FOH Engineer Miguel Tapia, Zuniga continues: “Miguel is one the finest mix engineers out there, and Lez Dwight, Director of Britannia Row, and Ops Coordinator Shawn Dier from Clair LA’s office have all been so supportive of us. I thought that smaller tours wouldn’t get the same attention as the big ones, but I was wrong.”

 

The tour is running a pair of Allen & Heath DLive CTi1500s at both monitors and FOH with DMO MixRack and DX012, fitted with a pair of GigaAce cards for gain sharing. Each console has a Waves card for multitrack recording and virtual soundcheck, with everything running native and no outboard. “We wanted a small yet powerful footprint that could take us from festival appearances to clubs, as we’ve played some tiny stages”, says Zuniga.

 

“Miguel introduced me to Allen & Heath on my previous tour with Mexican pop act RBD. Most of those venues were stadiums and Miguel was mixing on a large format DLive”, he adds. “In previous meetings with Mitch and Rob, they wanted to produce a show that sounded like Mitch’s record ‘Come June’, with analogue tubes etc. An analogue system was out of the question due to venue size, but we were very pleased with how this sounded.”

 

Zuniga uses Shure PSM 1000s for Rowland and drummer Sara Jones, Rowland’s wife, on JH Audio Roxannes, with the rest of the band, Matt Schuessler (bass), Rob Schnapf (guitars) and Aiden Finn (keys) opting for D&B Audiotechnik wedges. “Mitch and Rob are very particular with their guitar sounds. We travel with two vintage Ampeg Geminis and a vintage Fender Custom Deluxe for their rigs. We use a mixture of Shure KSM32 and Beyerdynamic M60 mics, with the vocal mic being an SE V7”, Zuniga concludes.

 

(Photos: Britannia Row Productions/Clair Global)

 

www.britanniarow.com

 

Mitch Rowland turns to Britannia Row for headline solo tourMitch Rowland turns to Britannia Row for headline solo tour

GLP-Scheinwerfer bei Senior-Bowl-Gala im Einsatz

Der 75. Reese’s Senior Bowl (mit dem 75. Anniversary Team) fand kürzlich in Zusammenarbeit mit der NFLPA im Hancock Whitney Stadium in Mobile, Alabama, statt. Anlässlich dieses Jubiläums wurde am Vorabend die 75th Anniversary Legends Gala veranstaltet, bei der einige Legenden des American Football auftraten.

 

Diese Football-Helden versammelten sich im Ballsaal des Battle House Renaissance Mobile Hotel, wo „Good Morning Football“-Moderator Peter Schrager (vom NFL Network) auf einem Podest Interviews führte. Bis zu 500 Gäste lauschten den Geschichten der Stars. Für die studioartige Beleuchtung wurde Mike Dorsett von Dorsett Productions Unlimited hinzugezogen, der für diese Produktion auf seinen Bestand an GLP-Scheinwerfern zurückgriff.

 

Dorsetts Design für die 75th Anniversary Legends Gala basierte auf zwanzig Fusion X-PAR 12Z, welche die Interviewsituation sowohl von oben als auch vom Boden aus beleuchteten. Hinzu kamen sechs Impression X4 Wash und vier Impression Spot One. „Im Battle House mussten wir die Beleuchtung an einem Ground Support anbringen, da die Hängepunkte bei der letzten Renovierung des Raums entfernt worden sind“, so Dorsett.

 

Mike Dorsett gründete sein Unternehmen 1986 und hat den GLP-Bestand seit seiner Einführung in das Portfolio durch Rick Fallon vor fünfzehn Jahren kontinuierlich auf über 100 Geräte ausgebaut. Zusätzlich zu den genannten Fusion X-PAR 12Z, Impression X4 Wash und Impression Spot One führt Dorsett Productions Unlimited auch Impression X4 S, JDC1, GT-1 FL und Fusion Exo Beam 10.

 

(Fotos: Travis Middleton/GLP)

 

www.glp.de

 

Lightswitch evolves “Enchanted: Forest of Light” with expanded Elation lighting package

Visual design group Lightswitch has overseen lighting design and creative direction for “Enchanted: Forest of Light” at Descanso Gardens in Southern California since 2016. This year, the one-mile nighttime walk through colorful lighting displays featured an expanded IP-rated lighting package from Elation that included the company’s new Proteus Hybrid Max.

 

“Enchanted” is an immersive visual experience to highlight the historic botanical garden’s beauty and flora. Each year, Lightswitch reimagines portions of the experience, enhancing areas and repositioning luminaires. This season’s show ran from November 19 through January 7 and included a new area as a result of refurbishment elsewhere in the gardens.

 

Lightswitch creates and produces the entire “Enchanted: Forest of Light” experience, designing lighting, media, and interactives, as well as overseeing music selection, sound design, and technical and logistical production. Under the leadership of Lightswitch Principal Chris Medvitz, the visual design of “Enchanted: Forest of Light” has consistently relied on Elation lighting for the past seven years. This year, Elation IP65 lighting was expanded to all areas of the display.

 

Collaboration with outside artists is an integral part of the “Enchanted” experience. On the main lawn, a series of magical stained-glass-inspired houses by sculptor Tom Fruin are internally lit with SixBar 1000 IP LED battens while in the rose garden geometric sculptures by artists Hybycozo glow from within using Proteus Lucius LED profile moving heads as a stream of moving effects emanate through the pieces.

 

A special Hybycozo art piece that features in the installation is a large, rotating mirrored star previously lit using Proteus Hybrid but now illuminated using Proteus Hybrid Max. “Choosing Proteus Hybrid Max made a lot of sense here because it is a smaller fixture, lightweight and includes technical updates”, states Medvitz. “We needed a tight, collimated beam to minimize the overspill which the fixture’s narrow beam allows us to do.”

 

The Proteus Hybrid Max, the IP66-rated upgrade of Elation’s Proteus Hybrid with new technology, provides versatility in areas like the newly created “Spectral Sanctuary”, where environmental impact is an issue. Concerned about disruption to the property’s lilac garden ecosystem, Lightswitch was asked to create an installation that minimized the amount of equipment incorporated around the plants.

 

“We moved the existing installation to an area of the garden that was less impactful on the specimens and created a new installation called Spectral Sanctuary”, explains Medvitz. “Here we placed Proteus Hybrid Max on towers along the edge of the garden to create a light show through the lilacs rather than lighting effects amongst the plants. We kept a safe distance and allowed them to have an impact without running a lot of cable and other equipment through the middle of the garden itself. It’s a different look than we have in the rest of the show.”

 

In past years, “Enchanted” leaned heavily on Elation’s Proteus Hybrid arc-source moving head, but over the last few years many of those fixtures were replaced by LED-based Proteus Maximus and Proteus Lucius luminaires, and now the Proteus Hybrid Max. Other IP-rated lights from Elation are used across multiple areas of the experience as workhorse luminaires such as the Seven Par 19IP/7IP so that Elation lighting now graces all twelve “Enchanted” environments. Creative Technology served as production partner for this year’s project, which included supply of the Elation lighting.

 

In “Fantasy Forest”, a large, dense area of trees and foliage where layers of lighting synchronize with an ambient soundtrack, Proteus Maximus deployed around the perimeter add a special layer of effect. Additionally, five to ten feet off the ground and hidden amongst camellia bushes are SixBar 1000 IP color-changing battens used as direct view eye-candy. RGB Pars lighting trees and plants provide a third layer of light.

 

Perhaps the most magical area of “Enchanted: Forest of Light” is the “Ancient Forest”, featuring ancient Redwoods and other species of plants that existed millions of years ago. Dramatically lit with accompanying soundtrack and fog atmosphere, “Ancient Forest” crafts an otherworldly ambiance. Here, Proteus Maximus  lined the back of the location and projected gobo patterns and moving beams.

 

Prior to “Enchanted” opening in November, many of the show areas served as the backdrop to a separately branded event: “Carved” is a family-friendly Halloween experience with luminous jack-o’-lanterns, carved pumpkins and oversized sculptures. Much of the lighting and infrastructure used in that area is shared with “Enchanted”, about two thirds according to Medvitz, but with different theming.

 

For guests, “Enchanted” and “Carved” are two different experiences, but from Lightswitch’s perspective, as well as a logistical viewpoint, they are one big project that runs from mid-September until mid-January, which means the lighting is outside and exposed for all that time.

 

(Photos: Chris Medvitz/Kathryn Rapier)

 

www.elationlighting.com

 

Shure-Drahtlossysteme beim Super Bowl LVIII im Einsatz

Shure-Drahtlossysteme beim Super Bowl LVIII im Einsatz

Zum ersten Mal fand der Super Bowl, das größte Spiel im American Football, im Allegiant Stadium in Las Vegas statt. Die Bewältigung der immensen Produktion des Super Bowl in der ohnehin schon überfüllten HF-Umgebung von Las Vegas stellte eine Herausforderung dar. Um die gewünschte Audioqualität sicherzustellen, nutzte das Produktionsteam Axient-Digital-Drahtlossysteme von Shure.

 

Das HF-Team nutzte zehn digitale AD4Q-4-Kanal-Empfänger, einem AD600-Axient-Digital-Spektrum-Manager und zwei AXT400-Axient-2-Kanal-Empfänger. ATK Audiotek und Professional Wireless Systems (PWS) kümmerten sich um alle drahtlosen Mikrofone und In-Ear-Monitoring-Systeme für die Unterhaltung vor dem Spiel, in der Halbzeit-Show sowie für die Schiedsrichter. Es ist bereits das 27. Jahr, in dem PWS als Drahtlospartner von ATK beim Super Bowl fungiert.

 

Zum Team gehörten unter anderem Broadcast Mixer Tom Holmes, Entertainment Front of House Mixer Alex Gussard, Entertainment Front of House Music Mixer Dave Natale, Monitor Mixer Tom Pesa, Lead RF Engineer Cameron Stuckey sowie die RF Techs Gary Trenda und Kasey Gchachu. Der HF-Teamleiter für CP Communications war Loren Sherman.

 

Michael Mason, Präsident von CP Communications, lieferte mit seinem Team 45 Kanäle Axient Digital und vierzehn Kanäle Shure-PSM-1000-In-Ear-Monitoring, die für die Studiosendungen vor und nach dem Spiel sowie für die Spielberichte vom Spielfeldrand verwendet wurden. Ebenso wurde Shure-Equipment für Studiosendungen in Las Vegas während der Vorwoche des Super Bowl sowie für die Eröffnungsnacht, den roten Teppich und die Ehrungen eingesetzt.

 

Einige Tage vor dem Spiel trafen die Football-Spieler auf Grammy-prämierte Musiker, gemeinsam gestalteten sie die Super Bowl Soulful Celebration mit Musik und inspirierenden Botschaften. Alle Interpreten waren bei dieser Veranstaltung mit Shure-KSM8-Mikrofonen ausgestattet.

 

Während des TikTok-Tailgate-Events betrat Sängerin Gwen Stefani die Bühne mit einem Axient Digital Sender, der mit einer neuen, patentierten Shure-Mikrofontechnologie ausgestattet war. Gesangskollegin Reba McEntire setzte bei ihrer Interpretation der US-amerikanischen Nationalhymne vor dem Anpfiff ebenfalls Shure Axient Digital ein: Sie nutzte einen Frequency-Diversity-Handsender, der mit einer vernickelten KSM11-Kapsel ausgestattet war. Die begleitende Drumline verließ sich ebenfalls auf Axient-Digital-Sender.

 

Auch Sängerin Andra Day verwendete für ihre Interpretation von „Lift Every Voice and Sing“ Shure-Axient-Digital-Frequency-Diversity-Handsender. Ebenso nahm Cameron Heyward von den Pittsburgh Steelers den Walter Payton Man of the Year Award mit einem Axient-Digital-Sender und einer KSM9-Mikrofonkapsel entgegen.

 

Während der Halbzeit-Show wurden ausschließlich Axient-Digital-Handsender (ADX2/ADX2FD) auf der Bühne eingesetzt, und fast alle Künstler nutzten neue Shure-Mikrofontechnologien. Für die Headsets verwendeten mehrere Künstler Axient-AXT100-Taschensender - darunter H.E.R., die das AXT100 für ihr Headset und ihre Gitarre nutze. Für ihren Auftritt verließ sie sich ebenfalls auf eine neue Shure-Mikrofontechnologie.

 

Die Schiedsrichter verwendeten zwei Axient-Digital-ADX1-Taschensender, die im Frequency-Diversity-Modus zusammenarbeiteten und mit Shures Subminiatur-Lavaliermikrofonen TwinPlex TL47 mit Kugelcharakteristik gepaart waren. Bei der CBS-Übertragung kamen ADX2-Handsender und Shure-Mic-Flag-Extender zum Einsatz.

 

Foto (v.l.): Cameron Stuckey, Kevin Lu, Gary Trenda, Jim Van Winkle, Kasey Gchachu. (Fotocredit: Shure)

 

www.shure.com

 

Kreateur begleitet „Jugend forscht“ 2024 in Berlin

Kreateur begleitet „Jugend forscht“ 2024 in Berlin

„Mach dir einen Kopf“ ist das Motto der 59. Runde des Nachwuchswettbewerbs „Jugend forscht“. Die Agentur Kreateur begleitet den Regionalwettbewerb „Jugend forscht“ und „Schüler experimentieren“ auch in diesem Jahr wieder in Berlin-Nord. Auftraggeber für Kreateur ist Bayer Pharma, das diesen Wettbewerb als Patenunternehmen unterstützt.

 

Der Regionalwettbewerb Berlin-Nord von „Jugend forscht“ fand am 13. und 14. Februar 2024 in den Räumen der Bayer AG statt. Für das Projekt baute Kreateur dreißig Präsentationsplattformen für die Teilnehmer sowie einen kleineren Bereich für „Schüler experimentieren“, die die Teilnehmer für ihre Wettbewerbsprojekte nutzen. Darüber hinaus verantwortete Kreateur die Infrastruktur für die jeweiligen Veranstaltungen und übernahm zusätzlich zur Umsetzung eine beratende Funktion.

 

Das Projekt „Jugend forscht“ hat inzwischen Tradition im Auftragsbuch von Kreateur: Seit ihrer Gründung 2014 begleitet die Berliner Agentur für Markenwelten, Live-Kommunikation und Marketing die Regionalwettbewerbe in Berlin und Brandenburg.

 

(Foto: Stiftung Jugend forscht e.V.)

 

www.kreateur.de

 

Jeremy Roth turns to Robe for Nathaniel Rateliff’s homecoming holiday concert in Denver

Singer-songwriter Nathaniel Rateliff and his band The Night Sweats played their sold-out annual homecoming holiday concert at the Ball Arena in Denver, Colorado, in December 2023. It was the second time the annual event, which has been running for some years, was staged at this venue, after moving to the larger space in 2022.

 

The lighting was crafted by Jeremy Roth, who has been Rateliff’s production designer since 2017. He utilized over 100 Robe moving lights - Fortes, Spiiders and MegaPointes plus a RoboSpot system - and programmed and operated lights for this seasonal holiday performance himself, working alongside lighting director Adam Waguespack who often takes the show on the road for him. At Ball Arena, Waguespack took on the role of coordinating the follow spots and RoboSpot system.

 

Additional video came in for the hometown production in the form of three large upstage screens, with the department overseen by Mike Grant (Black Keys). The production design saw both lighting and video technologies share the stage, based on a scaled-up version of their current “The Future” tour which hit the road in April 2023, and an augmented package used for another set of sold-out local shows at Red Rocks last summer.

 

The video screens, which were framed by single LED blinders, were one of Roth’s creative starting points for the Ball Arena show, with the overhead lighting rig like the touring version populated across six trusses. Two mid stage trusses were flown one above the other, arranged in gentle U-shapes, with a straight front truss over the stage apron at the front and a reverse U-shaped advanced truss.

 

The back truss was rigged with twelve Fortes to project textures on the red velour drape behind the video wall, with another thirteen Fortes on the front truss, working with four more on the advance truss. These last four Fortes were all running on a 4-way RoboSpot system. On this tour, the Fortes are replacing the BMFL Spots used on the previous tours’ RoboSpots systems. Nathaniel Rateliff’s long-term lighting, video and audio vendor Brown Note Productions had invested in Fortes ahead of the tour in April 2023, enabling them to transition from the BMFLs used in previous years.

 

Initially, LEDBeam 350s were on the rig, but these were eventually swapped out for the 33 Spiiders boosting the output and the wash coverage. Robe’s effects luminaire MegaPointe has been omnipresent on Rateliff’s lighting schemes ever since Roth has been onboard with the singer in 2017, initially as part of the floor lighting package. They have featured in every design since. At Ball Arena, eleven MegaPointes were positioned on the deck, and ten on the advanced truss.

 

Roth, Waguespack, and Grant engaged in three days of pre-vizing at Brown Note’s Studio in Denver ahead of the Ball Arena show, then three days of technical rehearsal at Denver Coliseum before loading in on the morning of the actual gig. Lighting was programmed on a GrandMA3 console running in mode 2.

 

(Photos: Jeremy Roth/Tobin Voggesser/Nocoast LLC)

 

www.robe.cz

 

Elation and Best Audio & Lighting support CQLP lighting design competition in France

Elation and French distributor Best Audio & Lighting provided lighting for the final of this year’s CQLP (C’est Qui Le Patron) lighting design competition in France. This was the first time the competition, that showcases lighting designer talent, was held outdoors, at the Collégiale Notre-Dame de Mantes-la-Jolie outside of Paris.

 

Using the grandeur of the medieval church’s architecture as a centerpiece, lighting design teams produced light shows that combined quality, creativity and technique. Following an elimination tournament round of sixteen, quarter-finals and semi-finals, two teams advanced to the grand finale on January 20.

 

There, the two teams had forty Proteus Maximus LED profile moving heads, twenty-four Proteus Excalibur sky beam moving heads, and forty Paladin Panel floodlights at their disposal to awe judges as well as a crowd of onlookers. As CQLP is a non-profit organization, the Elation lighting fixtures were generously provided for the final by Best Audio & Lighting.

 

Frederik Afif, International Sales Manager at Elation, sat on the jury with other lighting professionals and was impressed with what he saw. “It was an unforgettable and historic evening and a real pleasure to witness firsthand the incredible talent and creativity showcased by the finalists using the Elation lights”, he says. “The displays were just mesmerizing, and I’m immensely impressed by the dedication and innovation demonstrated by all the teams involved.”

 

CQLP has taken place since 2018 with the primary aim of promoting lighting professionals and the lighting design profession. The competition also presents an opportunity for aspiring designers to access a network of established industry professionals. This year’s final was broadcast live on social networks and for rebroadcast and can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rrThKsrBf0.

 

(Photos: Best Audio & Lighting/Collégiale Notre-Dame de Mantes-la-Jolie/Donatien d’Espinay/Elation/Sandrine Leclercq-Moreau)

 

www.elationlighting.com

 

GrandMA3 lighting control system selected for Crush shows in Seoul

GrandMA3 lighting control system selected for Crush shows in Seoul

Korean record producer and singer-songwriter Crush recently played several concerts - in support of his latest album, “Wonderego” - at Seoul’s Jamsil Arena, for which Soyoun Lee designed, programmed and operated the lighting. Lee is currently working for Lite Factory in Korea, designing and programming shows for K-Pop music artists in Singapore and Korea. For the first time, she chose to run the lighting control on a full GrandMA3 system.

 

Lee had used the GrandMA3 console/hardware many times already (running in mode 2) and felt that this was a great time to “make the switch”, for which she prepared herself via online training videos and in-person training arranged by MA Lighting’s Asia Pacific base in Singapore.

 

The GrandMA3 lighting set up at the “Wonderego” concerts comprised one GrandMA3 full-size, one GrandMA3 light, one GrandMA3 processing unit XL, one GrandMA3 processing unit L and three GrandMA3 8Port Nodes, controlling a total of 329 lighting fixtures - a mixture of moving and static lights and LED fixtures and panels, all adding up to 17,685 parameters.

 

Lee used three main GrandMA3 features - Recipes, Selection Grid and Phasers - as the backbone of her workflow. She also likes Swipeys which offer swift access to the menu eliminating the need to manually input commands, and she also appreciated the timecode’s minus offset function so it can be adjusted back and forth as needed.

 

Inspired by the “Wonderego” album artwork, the show creative director Eddie Oh designed some triangular set risers complete with a thrust stage so Crush could get out close to his fans. He added five square shaped lighting pods flown downstage on an automation system bringing further elements of surprise to the show, and the central pod was used to elevate the artist.

 

To accentuate his idea, Lee added a truss mimicking the angles of the riser design above the A stage, populated with lights that could be utilised as lines or for surfaces. “Lighting can really help the artist communicate their stories and narrative”, she states.

 

(Photos: P Nation)

 

www.malighting.com

 

GrandMA3 lighting control system selected for Crush shows in SeoulGrandMA3 lighting control system selected for Crush shows in Seoul

Kerstcircus Ahoy lit with Chauvet

Kerstcircus Ahoy has pretty much everything fans expect to find in a circus, from trapeze artists and acrobats to jugglers and clowns, including the Austrian clown Don Christian. But this popular wintertime event, which has been captivating audiences for over a half-century, doesn’t stop there.

 

Drawing acts from across the world, Kerstcircus Ahoy, which recently completed its 51st season of joy, served up performances that totally surprised anyone who entered the Ahoy arena in Rotterdam, Netherlands, expecting to see typical circus fare. From “Space Elements”, the human pyramid builders from Ukraine, to RCC Aruba and their Caribbean-inspired springboard act, to the gravity-defying young Austrian Stefan Dvorak, this circus featured entertainment that went “above and beyond” (often quite literally) to exceed all expectations.

 

Supporting these performances and adding to the excitement of the circus was a colorful, and sometimes dramatic, lighting design by Ricky Bouckenhove of Live Systems that featured seventy Chauvet Professional fixtures. Bouckenhove, who has been lighting the circus for twenty-four years, relied on a mainly blue and white color palette to highlight its twelve different acts, which featured performers from sixteen different nations.

 

At the circus’ center ring, he hung twenty-four Maverick MK2 Spot fixtures on the 19-meter circular truss. Drawing on the 440 W light cannon’s 16-bit dimming, he was able to have smooth fades at the conclusion of acts. Bouckenhove also arranged fourteen Maverick MK2 Wash fixtures on the floor around the edges of the circular ring. These units lit aerial acts, while also colorizing the track itself. An additional twenty MK2 Wash fixtures enhanced the circus’ magical ambience by backlighting the area. At selected points during the circus, the wash fixtures were also used to create a dramatic effect by silhouetting the performers.

 

There were also twelve Color Strike M motorized strobe-washes in Bouckenhove’s rig. He used these fixtures to light the stands and to underscore high-impact moments with strobe effects. Speaking of his lighting system for the circus, Bouckenhove notes: “Since the acrobats regularly needed target points, it was important that these points were programmed in the correct position and that the moving lights maintained the correct pan and tilt values.”

 

(Photos: Charles Batenburg/Eva Ruiten/EvaCaptures)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

Antonis Remos tours with equipment from DiGiCo and Klang

Monitor engineer George Panolaskos has been working with Greek singer Antonis Remos since 2017. He began using Klang gear in 2019 and chose the Klang:Konductor for Remos’ 2023 summer tour. Panolaskos had a long-standing interest in Klang before finally deploying two Klang:Fabrik units for Remos’ band four years ago, which also marked the first time a Klang system had been used in Greece.

 

“Having Klang in my signal chain provides me with a powerful FPGA, controlled via a DiGiCo console”, he says. This hybrid approach means Panolaskos enjoys freedom in his mixing, can utilize the consoles cueing, and can listen to the musician’s mix, adjusting it when needed. “By using Klang, I’ve achieved a personal mixer system without the need for any unecessary AD/DA conversion.”

 

One of the primary challenges Klang has helped overcome pertains to the large size of Remos’ band, requiring a considerable number of channels. “For years, I’ve recognised a persistent issue with other personal mixer systems, which is the limitation on channel count”, says Panolaskos. “When channels are limited, it becomes necessary to create AUX groups. This presents significant drawbacks. Not only does it impede a musician’s full control over the channels, it also mandates routing effects through busses.”

 

“As a result, you don’t have the detail to manipulate the effects according to individual mix”, he continues. “This is not the case with Klang. Our current setup incorporates a DiGiCo Quantum 338 console, a Klang:Konductor, featuring 64 inputs including all the FX returns, and the system accommodates all sixteen musicians at 96 kHz.”

 

(Photos: DiGiCo/Klang)

 

www.digico.biz

www.klang.com

 

UK panto shows lit with Robe

Lighting designer Andy Webb specified Robe for two high-profile UK 2023-24 panto season shows - “Snow White & The Seven Dwarves” at Aylesbury Waterside Theatre in Buckinghamshire, directed by Chris Wilkins-Nelson, and “Cinderella”, directed by Benji Sperring, staged at the Malvern Festival Theatre in Wiltshire, both produced by Martin Dodds for UK Productions (UKP).

 

The 1200-capacity Waterside Theatre is the larger venue in terms of both stage and audience sizes, and here Webb utilised sixty Robe luminaires - a dynamic mix of T1 Profiles, Spiiders, MegaPointes, BMFL WashBeams, LEDBeam 150s, Cyc FX8s and ParFect 100s, together with elements of the in-house generic rig.

 

The 850-seat Festival Theatre - now known as Malvern Theatres - is a cozier space and has been a provincial arts centre since 1885, and here Webb specified 45 Robe fixtures which were a combination of MegaPointes, ParFect 100s and 150s, DL4S Spots, LEDWash 300s, plus some of the regular house conventionals.

 

Webb programmed the shows using Avolites Tiger Touch II consoles, each featuring approximately 300 cues. The additional production lighting equipment, including all the Robe products, was supplied by rental specialist CEG. Shaun Ellis was Webb’s LX1 on both productions, and he also drew up all the follow spot plots.

 

As always, time was the biggest challenge in lighting both shows. The lighting get-ins were on Sundays for show openings on the following Thursday. Webb received some set reference photos during construction and while the assorted drop cloths were being printed and painted, leaving three days onstage to make it all happen.

 

At cast rehearsals during the day, he concentrated on real-time key and face lighting also filming the action, then worked overnight adding all the layers, details and complexities. “Due to the number of scenes and the hectic pace of the shows and of panto in general, the workflow is always fast and furious”, he explains, so having familiar fixtures is a must. “I can’t get more time, but having the right tools enables me to work quickly, more efficiently and achieve more in a short timeframe”, he adds.

 

In Malvern, Webb used the MegaPointes as his general spots as no T1s were available for that show due to high demand. He programmed the MegaPointes like they were T1s, including plenty of shutter work. He was delighted to have T1s back at Aylesbury after a gap last year. “I’ll spec T1s every time for panto”, he notes.

 

The overhead fixtures for both shows were spread out over six LX bars with a spot-wash-spot-wash configuration to achieve maximum coverage, and a fan of MegaPointes for specials and pick-ups. In both venues, Spiiders (Aylesbury) or ParFects (Malvern) were rigged on the apron truss or in the side positions, utilised as front kickers and side fill. The LED chips in the Spiiders, LEDBeams and ParFects are identical which assists with continuity and programming.

 

Webb loves many things about lighting panto including the “no rules” relating how scenes and characters should or should not be lit. Both theatres had new LED pros arches installed this year as part of the lighting/scenic setup, which allowed Webb to get even more interactive with audiences and draw them into the stories with lighting effects.

 

Webb and Ellis stayed with each of the shows for the first three days of their runs, with Aylesbury clocking up 57 shows over four weeks, entertaining around 50,000 people, and Malvern delivering 38 performances to approximately 30,000 people across three weeks.

 

(Photos: Barry Rivett/Lisa Roberts)

 

www.robe.cz

 

Von Nüssli realisierte Achtfach-Turnhalle in Monheim feiert Richtfest

Von Nüssli realisierte Achtfach-Turnhalle in Monheim feiert Richtfest
Von Nüssli realisierte Achtfach-Turnhalle in Monheim feiert Richtfest

Im Frühjahr 2023 startete der Totalunternehmer Nüssli mit dem Bau der ersten Achtfach-Sporthalle Europas in Monheim am Rhein. Nach weniger als einem Jahr Bauzeit feierten die Beteiligten des Pionierprojekts am 26. Februar 2024 das Richtfest. Die Sporthalle ist Teil eines Maßnahmenplans zur Neugestaltung des Schulzentrums Berliner Ring. Nach den Sommerferien 2024 soll die Halle fertiggestellt sein und für den Sportbetrieb zur Verfügung stehen.

 

Noch im Jahr 2023 wurden die aufgehenden Wände sowie die Stützen in Stahlbetonbauweise fertiggestellt. Der Bau des Nebengebäudes konnte vor Weihnachten abgeschlossen und am 8. Januar 2024 mit der Errichtung der Grundkonstruktion für das Sporthallendach begonnen werden. Derzeit werden die letzten der bis zu dreißig Meter langen Binder der Dachkonstruktion montiert. Damit ist die Errichtung des knapp neunzehn Meter hohen Baukörpers abgeschlossen. Nun folgen der Innenausbau und die Fassadenarbeiten.

 

Nüssli plante die Sporthalle mit möglichst vielen vorgefertigten Bauteilen. Allein aus Holz wurden rund 600 Elemente für Wände, Decken, Dach und Fassade vorgefertigt. Besondere Maßnahmen erforderten Stützen und Konstruktionen aus Stahl und Beton im unteren Bereich der Halle. Die zum Teil sehr schweren Elemente, Fertigteilstützen mit 18 Tonnen und Spannbetonbinder mit 41 Tonnen pro Stück, mussten mit Schwertransportern angeliefert und vor Ort mit einem Autokran mit bis zu 700 Tonnen Tragkraft abgesetzt werden.

 

Der Berliner Ring, über den die Bauteile angeliefert wurden, konnte nach zweiwöchiger Sperrung wieder befahren werden. Um die Bauzeit zu verkürzen, erfolgten Prozesse wie die Produktion der Wand- und Deckenelemente parallel zu den Rohbauarbeiten vor Ort. Die Zeiteinsparung der Fertigteilbauweise gegenüber der Massivbauweise beträgt etwa ein halbes Jahr.

 

Als erste in Europa bietet die neue Monheimer Sportanlage rund 4.400 Quadratmeter reine Sportfläche mit zwei Vierfach-Turnhallen im Unter- und Erdgeschoss sowie Sport- und Gymnastikräumen in den Obergeschossen. Weitere 3.000 Quadratmeter Fläche werden für Umkleiden, Technik und Erschließung genutzt. Alle acht Felder können je nach Bedarf einzeln genutzt oder pro Ebene miteinander zu zwei großen Vierfachhallen verbunden werden. Zusätzlich ist eine ausfahrbare Tribüne mit 500 Sitzplätzen im Untergeschoss und weiteren 100 Sitzplätzen im Erdgeschoss vorgesehen. Das gesamte Gebäude ist abgesenkt, sodass die untere Sporthalle mit der Teleskoptribüne fünf Meter unter dem Boden liegt.

 

(Fotos: Nüssli/Tim Kögler)

 

www.nussli.com

 

Von Nüssli realisierte Achtfach-Turnhalle in Monheim feiert RichtfestVon Nüssli realisierte Achtfach-Turnhalle in Monheim feiert Richtfest

Brompton Technology helps D&B Audiotechnik create immersive demo in Japan

Brompton Technology helps D&B Audiotechnik create immersive demo in Japan
Brompton Technology helps D&B Audiotechnik create immersive demo in Japan

D&B Audiotechnik’s Soundscape technology was showcased at Japan’s 2023 Inter BEE tradeshow, integrating not only the German loudspeaker and amplifier manufacturer’s audio solution, but also video processing from Brompton Technology to deliver an immersive experience for show visitors.

 

As part of the demo setup, the D&B team used a 14 m x 2.5 m LED vision wall, composed of 140 ROE Visual LED panels powered by Brompton’s 4K Tessera SX40 LED processor and Disguise media servers, supplied by Japanese AV rental company Audio Visual Communications (AVC).

 

“Since the acquisition of a number of Visual, Lighting, and Media (VLM) companies, the D&B Group has the knowledge and capability to demonstrate what is possible in a fully integrated AVLM solution”, states Hideaki Matsubara, Department Manager of AVC. “We regard the amalgamation of high-quality video and audio solutions as an important factor for us to succeed in the immersive experience industry.”

 

“True immersion involves engaging all the senses, with sight and sound being two key elements when re-constructing the ‘real’”, adds Elijah Ebo, Director of APAC Operations at Brompton Technology. “While sound activates a primal reaction within the brain, ‘What am I hearing?’, the next question the brain asks is, ‘What am I seeing?’. Being able to deliver an experience touching these two senses at a tradeshow was really exciting.”

 

(Photos: Brompton Technology/D&B Audiotechnik/Audio Visual Communications)

 

www.bromptontech.com

www.dbaudio.com

 

Brompton Technology helps D&B Audiotechnik create immersive demo in JapanBrompton Technology helps D&B Audiotechnik create immersive demo in Japan

Axel Melchior chooses Chauvet for Circus Knie

Lighting design by Axel Melchior supported Circus Knie, one of Europe’s oldest circuses, during its 2023 season. The shows featured a broad range of acts, from dancing horses to motorcycles spinning around in a sphere at high speeds whilst parallel to the ground. Melchior chose fixtures from Chauvet Professional to illuminate the various performances.

 

The circus’s waterfall stage, made up of a circular pond with a waterfall at its center, used 7,000 liters of water each day. Acrobats performed stunning feats on the surface above the cylindrical waterfall. Accenting their performance, as well as the beauty of the pond and fall, was a collection of 33 Chauvet Professional Colorado PXL Bar 8 motorized RGBW tilting battens supplied by Dushow.

 

Initially, Melchior considered using another IP65-rated Colorado model, the PXL Bar 16, but switched to the PXL 8 for a more exact fit around the circular stage. “We wanted a color rendering LED batten with tilt, zoom and pixel mapping that was IP rated”, he says. “Our initial thought was the PXL Bar 16, but the layout around the 8 m diameter stage didn’t allow us to integrate that product, so we opted for the Colorado PXL Bar 8 instead.”

 

“We used the wash lights mainly to illuminate the water during the various effects”, he continues. “The PLX’s zoom allowed us to obtain the right aperture without over-lighting the rest of the tent. We also lit the performers when we didn’t have a water effect. Our water system used a high volume recycled water every show.”

 

Melchior, along with artistic director Géraldine Knie, co-designer Julien Lhomme, and technical advisor John Masson of Dushow were so happy with the performance of the Colorado PXL Bar 8 that they decided to use the fixture again for the 2024 Circus Knie tour.

 

(Photos: Axel Melchior)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

Ben Green and Invoke create Emmys Red Carpet looks with Chauvet

Ben Green and Invoke create Emmys Red Carpet looks with Chauvet

On the Red Carpet at this year’s Primetime Emmy Awards, the lighting design featured 124 Chauvet Professional fixtures supplied by 4Wall Entertainment. As one of the producers of the Red Carpet event, Barrett Hall of Invoke Entertainment collaborated with lighting director Ben Green and producers David Jacobi, Neal Roscoe, and Jamie Watana to create a design that worked well on camera.

 

Playing a key role were 96 OnAir Panel 2 IP65, full-spectrum LED soft lights. Lining the entire Red Carpet space, from the arrivals area on through the step and repeat, these 1x2 format white light units provided supportive light for the cameras. “The OnAir Panels stood out for us due to their clean black housing, onboard power supply, IP rating, and adjustable PWM settings”, says Green.

 

“For this project, having the PWM flexibility was notably important because of how many different cameras controlled by a wide range of different people needed to play well together. This was especially true for the high-speed E! ‘Glambot’ camera taping slow motion reels”, he adds.

 

Although the media walk and step and repeat lighting was impeccable, some of the more fun moments of the design took place in the arrivals area, a new space for the Emmy Awards this year, where nominees and A-list guests met with their teams before hitting the red carpet.

 

Creating a richly textured setting in the arrivals area were sixteen Rogue R2X Wash fixtures and eighteen Rogue R1 BeamWashes. “They were our primary workhorses in this area”, says Green. “While the R2X Washes provided static, warm ambient light, the R1 BW fixtures were spotted down to add a subtle roving spotlight feel that offered some excitement without being distracting.”

 

“This was a team effort”, he concludes. “So many people helped us, including John Cox (gaffer); Ron Murphy and Dennis Sisul (best boys); Ryan Tanker (programmer/lighting director); Drew DeCorleto and Matthew Johns (4Wall); Nick Vincenti (staging supervisor); our local 33 electricians; and Salt Productions, as the lead production company.”

 

(Photos: Chauvet Professional/Invoke Entertainment)

 

www.chauvetprofessional.com

 

Ben Green and Invoke create Emmys Red Carpet looks with ChauvetBen Green and Invoke create Emmys Red Carpet looks with Chauvet

SWG returns to Mobos with Martin Audio WPL line array

In a repeat of their deployment at Ovo Arena Wembley for the 25th Mobo Awards, SWG Events this time headed north with their Martin Audio WPL Line Array to the 12,500-capacity Utilita Arena in Sheffield for this year’s event.

 

The live performances ranged from UK rap to Afrobeats, Dancehall to Pop/R&B and Garage, with back-to-back performances from Soul II Soul, Ghetts, Sugababes, Cristale, Byron Messia, King Promise and Camidoh, plus a Garage set from DJ Spoony. The event was hosted by Babtunde Aleshe, Indiyah Polack and Zeze Mills.

 

It required SWG Events to increase the WPL box count from sixteen to eighteen elements for each of the main L/R hangs, compared with last time; but more significantly was the increased number of outhangs, comprising twelve-a-side WPC - all driven in 2-box resolution from iKon iK42s.

 

As with the previous Mobo Awards, which took place in November 2022, they chose an 18-box SXH218 sub array in end fire configuration, with three rows of six subwoofers delayed to a central point. “That works well in these arenas because you can achieve the broadside array coverage without intruding on the set design”, says Simon Purse, SWG Events’ Head of Audio. “It can sometimes be quite challenging with such a visually oriented set.”

 

To avoid interference with the LED screen the PA was trimmed at little higher than normal. Below, there was just a single stage but with a catwalk thrust on stage left, while on stage right there was a smaller thrust for the guest presenters. SWG Events turned their attention to the stage, providing a number of Martin Audio’s XE500 monitors for foldback and adding stage sidefills on each flank in the shape of Torus T1215 stacked on a pair of SXC118 cardioid subwoofers on each side.

 

Purse formed a tag team with freelance engineer Matt Pope, who handled system tech and alternated FOH duties. “Matt focused on the musical performance elements while I handled presenter mics and guests”, says Purse, adding “there were a lot of different intricacies, and the infrastructure behind the show was complex compared with a standard headline arena show.”

 

“We had our stage system, which was split to FOH and monitors, and another split to an OB truck, which was handling the live broadcast mix”, he continues. “Finally, there were further split heads to a TV truck that was dealing with the presenter microphones and presenter IEM units as well as a separate broadcast mix for presentation later in the week.”

 

Having received the CAD files from the venue, the SWG Head of Audio was able to plan ahead, arriving on site with all presets stored and ready to go. “For due diligence I then always take additional measurements”, says Purse. “You never know exactly what you will find so I was able to fine tune it and utilise the array snapshot feature to update my array optimisations.”

 

Crew included Will Fisher (monitors); Ian Williams (playback/comms); Phil Hughes (RF tech); Fraser Wilks, Sam Jones, Laura Evans (stage patch and general audio engineering); Mark Bott (SWG Operations Manager); and Henry Roper (SWG Production assistant. All worked under overall production manager Rob Smalldon of Marvellous Incorporated Ltd, as last year.

 

(Photos: Martin Audio/SWG Events)

 

www.martin-audio.com

 

Thomas Cassetta chooses DPA Microphones for stand-up shows, documentaries and podcasts

Thomas Cassetta chooses DPA Microphones for stand-up shows, documentaries and podcasts

Production sound and re-recording mixer Thomas Cassetta says he’s always loved live theater and events, so when presented with the opportunity to work on comedy specials back in 2014, he jumped at the chance. Cassetta has worked on projects around the globe for platforms such as Netflix, Amazon, Tubi, Peacock, HBO and ShowTime.

 

His most recent stand-up production work includes recording and mixing comedian Akaash Singh’s first hour-long comedy special, as well as Pete Davidson’s new Netflix special entitled “Pete Davidson: Turbo Fonzarelli”.

 

On his many projects, Cassetta uses solutions from Danish professional audio manufacturer DPA Microphones, such as the D:facto 4018VL Vocal, 4017B Shotgun, 4018C Supercardioid and 2011 Twin Diaphragm Cardioid Microphones, as well as the 4080 Cardioid Condenser Lavalier Microphone and the brand’s newest 2012 Compact Cardioid and 2017 Shotgun Microphones. A selection of DPA’s in-line preamps and accessories also allow him to adapt to a variety of venues and locations.

 

(Photos: DPA Microphones/Thomas Cassetta/Nathan Lindstrom/Lindstrom Photography LLC)

 

www.dpamicrophones.com

 

Thomas Cassetta chooses DPA Microphones for stand-up shows, documentaries and podcastsThomas Cassetta chooses DPA Microphones for stand-up shows, documentaries and podcasts

Version 2 supplies lighting for EE BAFTA Film Awards

Version 2 supplies lighting for EE BAFTA Film Awards

Hosted for the first time by David Tennant, the 2024 EE BAFTA Film Awards took place on February 18 at London’s Royal Festival Hall, and was broadcast internationally on BBC One, iPlayer and BritBox International. Attended by the President of BAFTA, HRH the Prince of Wales, twenty-five Awards were presented, voted for by over 7,500 BAFTA creatives and film industry practitioners.

 

TV, broadcast and event lighting specialist Version 2 was, for the first time, the official lighting supplier for the EE BAFTA Film Awards. Version 2 supplied lighting and manpower for the live Awards ceremony, artists performances and the traditional obituary tribute, as well as the audience lighting and the live event broadcast. Also involved in designing for the Awards for the first time were lighting director Tim Routledge of Tim Routledge Lighting Design, and set designer Julio Himede from Yellow Studio New York, in a partnership first formed for the Eurovision Song Contest in 2023.

 

“It’s a tricky show as you are only in the venue for a short time with a very short load in and load out”, explains Routledge. “The live show starts at 6 p.m. and is broadcast as live on television around 8 p.m., so there is a super-quick turnaround to get it out that night with editing happening on the fly.”

 

The centrepiece of Himede’s set design was a series of outlines of the BAFTA Award mask, arranged in a circular fashion and backed by a large, semi-circular gauze around the back of the stage. The show was lit using a mix of the Royal Festival Hall’s house rig and lighting from Version 2. “We used 310 x 1 m long Martin VDO Sceptron 10s rigged vertically behind the sculptural set piece, back-lighting the semi-circular gauze to add a load of sparkle and give the appearance of a giant zoetrope”, says Routledge. “This involved a lot of work in the framework and the rigging of all those Sceptrons overnight.”

 

Version 2 chose gaffer Sam Healey, who has a track record working on the BAFTAs and with Routledge, to keep everything on track. “We were able to collect the truss for the Sceptron in advance and spent a good couple of days pre-rigging them onto the framework, labelling and patching them so we were able to install it all within the short timeframe”, says Healey.

 

With the central set piece predominantly washed in reds, blues and golds, the Sceptrons provided a twinkly backdrop behind the presenters. This changed to more vibrant, dynamic effects and content for Sophie Ellis-Bextor’s performance of “Murder on the Dancefloor”, with more sparkles added for comedian Nick Mohammed’s appearance. The mood was later transformed to a serene, ethereal monochrome during Hannah Waddingham’s rendition of “Time After Time” as BAFTA paid tribute to artists who had passed away this year.

 

Version 2 supplied Robe Forte fixtures for Routledge’s key lighting on the performers and presenters, with more Robe Forte units, in conjunction with a Robe Robospot system, as follow spots. Martin Mac Aura XBs were rigged on the front truss and bridges, and more Mac Auras on the floor upstage by the drape. A half circle of Robe Megapointes were rigged around the curved onstage truss completed the onstage lighting inventory, while Astera Pixelbricks were rigged on stage facing outwards to light the audience. Version 2 drafted in freelancers Tom Young as operator for the moving lights and Seb Williams for the key lights. 

 

“The Royal Festival Hall is a tricky place to light because, not being a particularly modern venue, there’s not many rigging positions”, says Routledge. “It’s a modern-looking show however so, for the first time this year, we added in more lighting features around the room, on the balcony fronts and down the walls to make it pop more on camera than in the past.” To add definition and interest to the room, Routledge mounted 2 m Astera Hyperion tubes horizontally on the front of the auditorium boxes. He also added Robe LED Beam 150 fixtures to the back wall of the stalls and dress circle for eye candy effects during the walk downs.

 

Also on Version 2’s kit list for the EE BAFTA Film Awards 2024 were Astera HydraPanel, Litepanels Gemini 2x1 Soft Panel, Fomex FL-1200 2x1, Fomex FL-600 1x1, and Prolights Smart BatPlus. V2 Project Manager was Nick Edwards.

 

(Photo: Richard Murgatroyd Photography/BAFTA)

 

www.v2lights.co.uk

 

GrandMA3 for Hypersonic Fest

GrandMA3 for Hypersonic Fest
GrandMA3 for Hypersonic Fest

Hypersonic Fest was a one-day experimental event organized by Hypersonic Lab in Hong Kong, aimed at inviting people to enjoy the talents of 37 diverse Christian artists and music bands from Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, and Malaysia. The festival was staged at Kowloon Bay International Trade & Exhibition Centre and featured four stages of live music performance.

 

Production equipment for the Main Stage including lighting was supplied by the MPHK Group and project managed by Raymond Wong, working closely with LD Kei Lui who utilized a GrandMA3 full-size console, a decision taken jointly between the LD and Wong. Lui is based in Macau and is technical manager of the Para Club, as well as running his own company in Hong Kong/Macau for freelance lighting design projects like this. He has been a GrandMA user for many years including in the club, having recently switched to GrandMA3.

 

His task at Hypersonic Fest was to light all the bands on the Main Stage, many of whom he was seeing live for the first time, and make each one look different. This had to be achieved in a compressed timescale of four hours for get in, set up, prep and programming. Lui had 43 moving lights in the space on overhead trusses with around 1200 parameters of control.

 

(Photos: Hypersonic Fest)

 

www.malighting.com

 

Eighth Day Sound delivers audio solutions for Dizzee Rascal’s “Boy in da Corner” 20th anniversary tour

Eighth Day Sound delivers audio solutions for Dizzee Rascal’s “Boy in da Corner” 20th anniversary tour
Eighth Day Sound delivers audio solutions for Dizzee Rascal’s “Boy in da Corner” 20th anniversary tour

Eighth Day Sound was the vendor for British grime MC and rapper Dizzee Rascal’s recent UK tour which hit several arenas following a major comeback at London’s O2. Choosing Eighth Day Sound and mixing Rascal’s hard-hitting yet melodic blend of London hip hop, is FOH Engineer Wayne “Rabbit” Sargeant, who has navigated the artist’s live work on and off the road.

 

“Over the years, I’ve mastered some of Dizzee’s earlier album live tracks. So, my aim here was to bring consistency to the overall range of tracks spanning the 20th anniversary”, he explains. Sargeant has a Solid State Logic Live 100 for the main mix, while the DJ setup is processed through a Solid State Logic Fusion to add some weight and tame the high frequency, allowing the D&B Audiotechnik KSL PA system to sound vast at a lower level.

 

Rascal’s vocals are processed with an Empirical Labs EL8 Distressor. “I also add a very short reverb from a Bricasti M7 to soften and help sit the vocal”, says Sargeant. “The vocals are also sent to a stem, which is used as a side chain into the master bus multi-band compressor. It dips the mid-range pocket for the vocals to sit in the master mix, with the final mix going to the SSL Bus+.”

 

The team were met with some acoustically challenging venues, and with that in mind, asked Eighth Day Sound to supply a D&B KSL rig. “From tailoring the PA system and making it work for our needs and our budget, Eighth Day provided a truly great service”, says Sargeant who credits Systems Engineer Eddie O’Brien with developing a “perfect outcome”.

 

Monitor Engineer Edd Slaney was charged with both monitor duties and the DJ set-up, inadvertently assuming the role of show caller. “For that reason, I’ve always asked for great techs to come with my kit”, he explains. “I need a second set of eyes with me while I’ve got my head in one system or another. Liam Halpin looked after me for this run and was awesome as always.”

 

Rascals’s monitoring preference is the Shure PSM1000 IEMs with D&B M2 wedges, alongside Sennheiser 6000 Series RF mics, and Slaney’s desk of choice is a DiGiCo SD5. “This show requires much more than our normal festival set-up in terms of comms and matrix requirements”, he says. “The mixes for the performers on stage aren’t overly complex, so I’m able to use Dizzee’s tours to try out combinations of kit to establish what I do and don’t like.”

 

Tommy Sheals-Barrett of Back On Your Heads was the Production Manager on this tour.

 

(Photos: @lili_takesflickis)

 

www.8thdaysound.com

www.clairglobal.com